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  1. #11
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    "Fixed?" You make it sound like there's something wrong with Dreamworks! They've put out some very good movies lately and I expect that they will only get better with the possible addition of Glen Keane.
    -Meredith
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  2. #12
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    Dreamworks should do tons 2d features, they have enough moneys.

  3. #13
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    Robert surmised that this likely has to do with Glen's multi-million dollar contract.
    Wait.. what? Contract.. multimillion dollars? What are these foreign words you speak? I thought contracts were done away with years ago.

    It is hard to know what the issues are from the outside or even if there's anything problems at all. Glen has never struck me as the Machiavellian type, since he probably could've negotiated better deals during the peak of 90's animation boom. Though he's probably one of the last artists to have that kind of leverage over salary. If he was considering leaving Disney, I'd wager it would be over creative differences.

    "Fixed?" You make it sound like there's something wrong with Dreamworks!
    I think fans tend to get upset over the Shrek and Megamind bread and butter films. As long as they come out with a Dragon once in a while, I don't mind the others. Actually I'm grateful they're giving so many talented artists and engineers work.

  4. #14
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    Keep in mind that Jeffrey Katzenberg (The letter K in Dreamworks SKG) worked with a lot of these talented artists/animators at Disney before he formed Dreamworks with partners Spielberg and Geffen.

    If the stories are to be believed he was an animation convert, having initially cared more for the business side than the creative side. The story goes that he fell in love with the artform and had a considerable impact on the rise of animation as it headed toward it's peak. He certainly knows the value of talented animators like Glen Keane from first hand experience.

    Wait.. what? Contract.. multimillion dollars? What are these foreign words you speak? I thought contracts were done away with years ago.
    Glen Keane isn't your average talent in the industry. Even a ten year contract expiring this year (if that was indeed what he signed) would place it's original signing way way back in the fun filled crazy hazy this-animation--thing-will-go-on forever bygone days of 2001. After his line of clear successes it seems reasonable that Disney would want to lock Keane in for as long as they could keep him.

    What if Glen signed a contract with the release of 'Beauty and the Beast'? A twenty year contract would expire... this year.

    If he was considering leaving Disney, I'd wager it would be over creative differences.
    I can agree with this but when a contract expires... it forces decisions.
    A basic premise of the human being is that people do not work for money. (Ref: Maslow's Heirarchy of Needs)
    Once the basic needs of life are met people care more about principles and ideals.
    Money is just the means to an end.

    Though he's probably one of the last artists to have that kind of leverage over salary.
    *Cough* *Sputter* *Gag* It's a good thing I wasn't drinking coffee.
    While I have no facts to back up this belief, I'd say it's likely that Glen Keane may be the highest paid animator in history. (Disclaimer: Unless his contract locked him into a lower rate... which would give him a financial incentive to leave)

    If the rule is "always leave at the top of your game"... Glen Keane should consider his options well after the rave reviews and success of 'Tangled'.
    Last edited by Rodney; 03-07-2011 at 07:58 AM.

  5. #15
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    Glen Keane isn't your average talent in the industry. Even a ten year contract expiring this year (if that was indeed what he signed) would place it's original signing way way back in the fun filled crazy hazy this-animation--thing-will-go-on forever bygone days of 2001. After his line of clear successes it seems reasonable that Disney would want to lock Keane in for as long as they could keep him.
    I'm sorry, I been in the industry for almost 8 years and I've never heard of anything like a 10 or 20 year contract for an artist or director. Perhaps he was obligated to finish Rapunzel/Tangled or maybe he wanted to see it through for personal reasons.. I don't know. I can say, no one I know at any studio is under contract for longer than a year for a reasonable sum of money and some are pretty darn good animators. Not only that but part of reason they're under contract is because they're foreign workers and the company has picked up their visa.

    Sure Glen is special but this is crazy talk. If you want this sorted out, it's probably best to ask someone at TAG about current and past contracts.

  6. #16
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    Sure Glen is special but this is crazy talk. If you want this sorted out, it's probably best to ask someone at TAG about current and past contracts.
    Jeremy,
    I shouldn't keep posting... this IS crazy talk.

    Still, I don't think this is all mystic mumbojumbo and shouldn't be too hard to figure out. If it is, then the industry should look into it ASAP.

    I fully understand why wage scale earners might rarely see anything exceeding a one year contract. A few bloggers I've visited recently appear to routinely sign non-exclusive freelance contracts. They may get paid less than others but one nice benefit is that they are free to work elsewhere and seek additionally lucrative freelance contracts. Glen Keane's current contract isn't like that. His is no doubt an exclusive binding contract that (historically) has locked him down. Hence... and by way of Robert's theory... my view on the current topic.

    TAG and others often talk of scale wages but (from what I've seen) they rarely talk about specific contracts. I'm not sure they are at liberty to do that. In fact, artists are often found under NDAs and/or specific prohibitions preventing them from sharing their wages with other artists, through their contract. According to TAG and others, Disney and Dreamworks recently got themselves into some serious hot water with regard to their collusion against artists on aspects of that.

    Aren't some contracts signed on a project by project basis?

    Lets do the math.
    For key players on a feature film that will takes 3-5 years to take all the way through production would that not equate to a three to five year contract? Would those investing in that feature film settle for only a one year contract with that key talent? Businessmen don't set themselves up for failure like that.

    Given his considerable experience and track record it's safe to say Glen Keane commands (through his contract) a bit more than the average contract.

    I don't know how many years Glen may have been locked in... who knows the details of his contract? With all due respect it is crazy talk to think someone like Glen Keane didn't command a pretty penny when he signed his last contract.

    Bottom line;Glen Keane is not just your average animator.

    Respectfully submitted in hope of better understanding the business of animation art.
    Last edited by Rodney; 03-07-2011 at 09:29 AM.

  7. #17
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    Almost everyone who works at dreamworks PDI is under contract, foreign or domestic. It makes the company much more.... FLEXIBLE :-) I'm not sure about the Dreamworks down in LA though.

  8. #18
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    Always consider the source... and in this case the source is an Anonymous poster on the TAG blog back in 2009:

    when Glen Keane re-upped his 7-year contract with Disney, it was public news. Disney publicly released the fact that it was $15 million over 7 years.
    Haven't had time to confirm this in any way but thought I'd move in that direction. Should be pretty easy to flush out if it was released publicly.

    The entirety of his post:
    I love how everyone loves to talk about how much money Glen Keane makes (as if THATS the baseline for your average animator).

    Besides, the only people who really know what he makes is Glen and his boss.

    I think you may have missed the point of the earlier post.

    By the way, when Glen Keane re-upped his 7-year contract with Disney, it was public news. Disney publicly released the fact that it was $15 million over 7 years.
    Additional Notes:
    April 1997--Animator Glen Keane ("Beauty and the Beast," "Pocahontas") signs seven-year Disney deal. Stock hits all-time high. Source: LA Times

    Glen began his work on 'Rapunzel' in 2003.

    ...and we'll end with heartfelt quotes. This one from the end of a Beliefnet blog interview with Keane on 'Tangled' from Nov 2010:
    I've always felt that hand-drawn has something so wonderful and can affect computer animation in a new way. This whole film was about taking the best of both worlds, infusing the best of hand-drawn and the best of computers. I want to continue to take hand-drawn to a whole new level, to have computers celebrate the artistry of drawing.
    and this one from not sure where but it relates to other topics here about Disney abandoning Princesses and Fairy Tales:
    For my next project I have some ideas in my mind. I really believe that the fairy tale has to be a big part of the future of Disney animation for us to continue to grow and be strong and to be who we are.
    Emphasis added.
    Last edited by Rodney; 03-07-2011 at 11:00 AM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyhopkins View Post
    I think fans tend to get upset over the Shrek and Megamind bread and butter films. As long as they come out with a Dragon once in a while, I don't mind the others. Actually I'm grateful they're giving so many talented artists and engineers work.
    I had a Mentor who works at Dreamworks. He said something as "like the Shrek sequels or not, they make good money...and that money funds the other films."

    So on one hand they may be repetitive and lackluster, but if it gives us Kung Fu Panda or Dragons then I am for it.

  10. #20
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    I don't want to drift the topic but what Jeremy and Zane say here about tolerating movies (sequels or whatever) that we personally don't care for is good advice.

    It's hard for purists to understand one simple fact; that audiences like to return to familiar places and see familiar faces again and again and again. That only happens with sequels, prequels and spinoffs folks.

    There is a lot of stuff out there I have no interest in watching. So I don't watch it. I don't don't buy the DVD. I don't rent it. I let others decide whether they want to watch it. If someone asks me I'm more than willing ato tell them why I'm interested or not interested in what they like watching.

    I really like the fact that there are a lot of jobs to fill in the animation industry. We need more of those jobs.
    Last edited by Rodney; 03-07-2011 at 01:09 PM.

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